Monday, August 11, 2008

I'm Over It

I burned up the bat phone over the tree deal for a bit and then had to get back to work.

The red-head seems to have gotten over his temper tantrum and is back to his quiet, laid-back self. On a good note, his eyes have gone from a rather blank, tuned-out look to bright and inquisitive. Soft eyes are what I really look for in a colt. Doesn't mean that they still won't get a little broncy here and there, it just means that they are trying to absorb what you doing with them.
Now that he looks like he is tuned back in, I decided to take him back to mom's to live and I will just haul him to town to continue his work. After my tree rant, Megan and I hauled horses to the arena and took Smoke with us. He was a lot quieter than I thought he would be...just sorta looked around and sniffed everything...just like a dog-silly boy. We lunged some, saddled in the wide open spaces of the arena and lunged some more. He took it all in stride. I ponied him a little bit and spent some time getting on and off my horse next to him. That is one thing that still seems to bother him. Finally, I let Megan pony him a little while. Good experience for her and him. Of course Megan is never one to just do the minimum. She decided that she was going to pony him from the opposite side. Most of the time, you keep the horse being ponied on your right side, but you really should pony from both sides(just like leading).

Smoke wasn't too sure about that...

Getting the idea...

No problem now...

Getting better about being next to him...

Still not so sure about tugging on the saddle...
For safety measures, we NEVER dally the leadrope to the saddle horn. With broke horses, we may loop the leadrope around the horn, but if a horse pulls away, the rope simply slips away. With a colt, we don't even do that. The leadrope is doubled(never coiled) in our hand. If a colt pulls away, you can partially release the leadrope, allowing the colt to move away, but hopefully not GET away. If they really go bonkers-We let go!!
I learned that lesson the hard way, many, many years ago. I thought I could get a colt to lead with me by dallying to the saddle horn...ummm NOT a good idea. The colt sat down and almost pulled my saddle horse over on top of me. No more dallying horses to the saddle horn.

The gelding I rode today was Leo...
While I can appreciate that Leo is a cowboy's dream horse, he is not one of my favorites. He has the most horrible. disjointed lope...Man this horse is rough!! Of course, he is built like a brick outhouse and you just know that he can't be smooth looking at that flat, chested front end and it took a year and a half of regular trimming to get rid of most of his horrible pigeon-toes...
However, Leo is a finished Head, Heel, Barrel, Breakaway and Pole horse. My brother has won a lot of money on him in the team roping and at ranch rodeos. And brother's various cowgirl girlfriends have won a ton of money on him in the barrels. It's not hard to imagine why when you look at his huge motor...
I have never got to run barrels on the big guy, so my curiosity is piqued. I want to get him legged up and see what he can do. Today, I found out that he finds it very difficult to slow work the pattern. He is very chargy and doesn't want to enter the pocket in the correct leads. A little of it may come from being out of condition, but I can tell a lot of it has to do with the girls that were riding him. Most girls ride every barrel horse the same way. He has had several girls ride him in the past and he isn't just too sure where to go anymore. I try to ride each barrel horse the way that makes it the easiest for the horse...as long as they are in the correct leads going into their barrels and not slamming shoulders down and hitting barrels. All I can say is that Leo needs some work before I get the thrill of opening him up to see how he runs.

I gotta go hug Moon, for being such a wonderful horse. All these others really make me appreciate his mellow attitude and the ease at which he can be "fixed" when things get a little wonky.

8 comments:

Train Wreck said...

Wow he has a great Hind end! Bravo on the "correct" way to pony a horse!! We do the same thing. Also I get on from both sides of my horse! I know I am a rebel!!
And I have two words for you "Las Vegas" Girl trip to Las Vegas, they can handle us!! NFR! Make arrangements, I will be there for the Cowboy Christmas Convention 10 days! I will be free after 6 pm! C'mon it will be fun! Even if we don't have tickets to the rodeo! South Point! is the place to hang out!! Soo much fun!!

BrownEyed Cowgirls said...

I'm in like Flynn, my wild friend!!!

ChoooChoooo-The train is gearing up for the first annual cowgirl blogger rendevouz...The NFR, Las Vegas, 2008!!

Allllll Abboard!!

Pssstt-Mrs Mom--you still up for wiring us our bail money???

Mikey said...

Lol, you girls are nuts :)
Love the post, great pics. Megan does a fine job training! The horses are beautiful as always :)
Read your mtn lion comment on Painted Promise. That story, wow. I'da shit myself for sure.

Pony Girl said...

Look at Megan go! I'm impressed.
That is sweet, you giving Moon an appreciative hug. I worked with my sister's pushy and often dominant mare the other night and OH MY, it made me really appreciate my mostly eager to please and quick-learning appy! It sure made me realize that a good personality match is so important~ that is, matching a horse's personality with our own personality!

The Knutson's said...

BECG- I saw your comment over at Mrs, Mom's blog, about having been out of horses for a while, and trying to remember all of your old knowledge about horses. I am right there with ya girlfriend, and I just wanted to say that it looks like you are doing a fine job!!!!

It's nice that you are taking the time with the "crazy redheaded" gelding. I rode a mare about one year ago, and I was told that she was well trained...until I got on her back. Then it was "Well, she WAS trained for about one month and that was about three years ago.No one has done anything with her since." Greeeeeaaat!!!

On the way home from an uneventful trail ride, she spooked at something, and then began spooking at me...up on her back!!!! She threw me around like a rag doll up there, and I finally had to 1/2 jump, 1/2 fall off of her, and then that reallly scared her.

It was awful, because what do you do when your horse is scared of YOU on her back??? Start from the ground up again, but as she is not my horse, I have just never opted to ride her again. Of course the owner wants me to, but I do not have the time to train someone else's mare for them.

Anyway...sorry this is so long, but I just wanted you to know that you ARE doing a great job with the starting/training of your young horses! You could send one over here to me anytime :)

kdwhorses said...

Great job! I agree and pony the same way! Both sides and get up and down on both sides, especially the young uns!!

Good job Megan!!

He has a nice hip to him. Can't wait to see what you do on him!

Hugs to Moon too! The great ones, you just have to let them know how much you appreicate them!

Saddle Mountain Rider said...

Again, your post is fun to read! When i was a kid, we ponied our colts and young mules. My dad wanted horses trained to ride or pack. Our favorite pony horse was one of our best pack horses, and he was big and stout so even the big colts didnt pose a problem for him.

Callie said...

Curious to see how you get on with Leo. That is one nice butt! Gotto love a Quarter Horse!